Category Archives: Blaagers

Well Daraz, tell us this #HotSecret already!

Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram have buzzing with the #HotSecret tag these last 3 days. Something is being launched by Daraz.Pk and they are trying to be a tease about it.


The advertisement on the website (which is extremely lewd and suggestive and hence not going to be posted on this blog), sort of gives it away. It has to be a phone or some kind of electronic device.

Ofcourse the folks on Social Media had some funny stuff tagged on the trend:

So what exactly is this #HotSecret?

OK Baba OK! I will tell you! Daraz is launching a new smartphone! For more details keep checking

Engro Corporation — I Am The Change

“Indeed, Allah will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves” (Quraan 13:11)

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Mahatma Gandhi

Many of us are prone to complain and moan; about how our country is going in the doldrums the government is corrupt and inefficient, the people are uneducated, the roads are filthy, there is poverty all around, etc. However, very few realize that the change that they are seeking will come from none but themselves. Luckily for Pakistan there are many who decided to stop complaining and become agents of change.

In 2012, Engro Corporation launched a small initiative to recognize these true stalwarts of society who have worked tirelessly to improve access to education, health-care and livelihoods for Pakistan’s poorest of the poor.The initiative aims to collaborate with the corporate and the philanthropic sector of the country and help individuals and institutions who are pioneering initiatives to improve lives across the spheres of Livelihoods, Education and Health.

I Am The Change (IATC) celebrates those who decided it wasn’t enough to moan and groan but to start the rebuilding of our nation one brick at a time. These heroes would have served their causes without fame and recognition but to magnify these causes we need to highlight them, to support them, and to spread their deeds far and wide.

I had the opportunity to meet some of these heroes last year during a bloggers meet that Engro organized at T2F. This year, I was invited to the awards ceremony by Xenith Public Relations, along with very limited people from the Social Media community. I wish there had been more of Social Media representation at the dinner who could have spread the word far and wide through our collective ‘pens’.

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The event was an extravagant affair, some may even call it a bit over-indulgent. However, as a Trustee of a charitable trust (Ihsaas Trust), I understand to some extent why Engro wanted to splurge on it. The ugly truth is that money attracts money. The dinner was for the high and mighty of society, a bid to attract them and to get them to fill out pledge forms to support this cause of highlighting the heroes of society. And sadly those type of people don’t show up to eat daal chawal outside your local masjid. However, I still think the event could have been equally grand with a little less spent on decor, food and ‘shashkay’. For 10% saved off the cost of the event, we could change several lives at Ihsaas Trust or any of the IATC award winners.

This year’s recipients included the Azat Foundation in the category of education, working to provide education and youth empowerment opportunities to individuals from various areas of Baluchistan including Noshki, Kharan, Awaraan amongst others.

In the category of Livelihoods, the award was given to Orangi Pilot Project that continues to focus on urban development and works with the underprivileged in the arena of micro-finance and micro-enterprises, helping set up small businesses such as embroidery, footwear manufacturing and other small cottage industries reaching out to over 100,000 individuals through various projects. The winner in the category of Health was Child Life Foundation (CLF) — an NGO providing comprehensive child health care services from emergency care to prevention. CLF provides free medicines, essential oxygen systems, medical monitors and most importantly trains doctors and nurses to help save the lives of children at imminent risk reaching out to approximately 800 child-patients every day.

1 IATC May 20152 IATC May 2015 3 IATC May 2015 5 IATC May 2015

Previous winners of the IATC Awards in the various categories include organizations such as The Dream Foundation; The Garage School; Patients Welfare Association; Karachi Vocational & Training Centre; Child Aid Association; KhwendoKor (Peshawar); Akhuwat (Lahore).

CEVMK8yVAAAU1oTSpeaking at the occasion, Ali Ansari – outgoing President & CEO, Engro Corporation said, “We strongly believe in empowerment of communities by highlighting change agents who are working in high-impact areas such as education, health and livelihoods. Pakistan has a growing young population which will be in need of job opportunities. Coupled with the fact that half of the country cannot read or write and up to 25 million children not having access to school, the country is faced with an education, health and livelihood emergency. In this scenario it is imperative that we join hands to empower agents of change who are working to improve these social issues – IATC is a partnership platform that creates awareness and provides recognition to the unsung heroes from across Pakistan in order to support and multiply their efforts.”

The IATC platform also announced a major development in terms of cross partnerships with different corporate organizations of Pakistan which included Coca-Cola, Mitsubishi Corporation, National Foods, K-Electric amongst others. The winners of the competition were selected based on the scope of their social work; level of impact, number of beneficiaries and the ability to replicate the program amongst other key considerations.The IATC award entails a financial grant along with aiding the NGO in terms of its capacity & organizational development whilst also ensuring employee volunteerism activities.


The evening included Ayesha Tammy Haq moderating a panel discussion with Ali Ansari and representatives from the corporate sponsors: Abrar Hassan from National Foods Limited, Kimihide Ando from Mitsubishi, and Zohair Sharif from Asiatic Public Relations representing Coca-Cola.

The one message that I found very useful from Ali Ansari’s speech was:

Corporations have slowly now realized that one solution that the world is looking for is Social Change. And that CSR is not just about lip service and throwing money at causes, but getting involved and really fostering change. Engro Corporation is on the right path with the I Am Change initiative. Let’s hope that more and more corporates join in to spark off a domino effect.

An evening of fun & frolic with Peek Freans Rio

As a parent, one is always on the lookout for opportunities to take the kids out to something fun and exciting out of the routine. Thus, when I got the invite from Asiatic Public Relations to the Rio Fun Carnival, I immediately whatsapped the invite to my kids’ secretary (AKA Mrs DM) to check on their busy schedule.

“We have a play date at a friend’s house in the evening.”

Ah! Just my luck. There goes my chance to spend some quality time with ’em! And I was a bit behind on my hours logged as a cool dad since the previous weekend I had been tied up with accompanying Ustaadh Adnan Rashid, while he was in Karachi for AlKauthar Karachi‘s workshop Signs of The Hour. And I had another meeting/dinner coming up on Sunday night.

The phone beeped and it was Mrs DM. The kids wanted to skip the play date and go to the Carnival! Yay!

We were met at the gate by APR folks who guided us through to the special area where the evening festivities were to take place. There were various attractions for the kids like a clown and face painting.


There were also plenty of goodies to be had — popcorn and cotton candy without measure. IB (my elder son) must have had atleast 5 of those cotton candies!). And ofcourse there were plenty of ticky packs of Rio — Pakistan’s Favorite Cream Biscuit — for all to much on.


Even I dived into a pack.


We had some very young participants to the carnival too…

The evening’s festivities were conducted by the entertaining and hilarious Khalid Malik, who can get kids as involved as he can adults. Incidentally, I first met Khalid at a trip to the beach that APR organized on behalf of Coke and our paths have crossed many a times since.


Speaking on the occasion, Zulfiqar Ali Ansari, Head of Marketing at English Biscuit Manufacturers (Pvt.) Ltd. (EBM), the makers of Peek Freans RIO, stated, “When you think of Peek Freans RIO, you think of the fun-filled and flavourful experience it provides, especially for children, as they are the main target consumers of this product. We at EBM strongly believe that an essential part of growing up is to have an active lifestyle, and our event is aimed to bring home this message in a fun way.”


Prizes such as X-boxes, play stations, bicycles, toys, stationery sets and branded gift hampers were given throughout the evening to winners who were chosen earlier through a competition that required people to text unique codes printed on Peek Freans RIO packs to a designated number. There were some very happy kids from all over Karachi that evening with big gift boxes.

The evening festivities also included a great juggling performance and a magic show that had the kids (and their parents) thoroughly entertained.


And this carnival seemed to have something common with the melas of Bollywood fame…

And once all the fun and frolic inside was over was all over, we had the opportunity to us free passes to some of the rides in the amusement park.

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All in all the evening was filled with fun and excitement. A much needed family evening of fun courtesy English Biscuit Manufacturers (Private) Limited.


TEDxKarachi – Reflections on inspiration

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Also cross posted on Express Tribune Blogs

TEDxKarachi 2011 was an event for the elite. It had a political slant to it. The line to get in was long, the air-conditioning sucked, there were too many technical glitches with the microphones. The snacks were mediocre.There were people there that didn’t deserve to be invited over many others that weren’t there. The talks were not all exactly what we see at TED Global. Yet I returned from the event thinking that making the impossible was possible. I returned with some ideas that inspired.


People went to TEDxKarachi with different mindsets. A lot showed up wanting to hear Imran Khan and Mukhtar Mai speak. Others wanted to go meet the right social crowd. Some went because everybody they knew was talking about it. I went to learn.

Having joined the family business after my Bachelors, I never got the chance to do my Masters. I had returned from University thinking I would get the 2-3 years of work experience and then apply to some hotshot MBA program. Now that I look at it, it really wouldn’t have made much difference. Running your own business gives you a better education than any MBA program. It however, has to be coupled with a desire to learn and adopt new ideas and concepts. Visiting TEDxKarachi was part of that learning.

Making the Impossible Possible

Despite the fact that a couple of speakers didn’t really fit in the general mold of making the impossible possible (Noori most definitely should be awarded a special mention of non-compliance), there was an undercurrent of achievement despite the odds. How to do something that others say is not possible, or to sacrifice things to achieve your dreams is what really moved me.

“Education is like tinday. You only eat them when you have to.”

While Fasi Zaka’s engaging and filled with humor talk was more like a presentation designed to evoke thinking, it was definitely not a case of making the impossible possible. It was however a case of the impossible that we really need to make possible. There is a real emergency on our hands. No I am not talking about the fact that our Armed Forces have been caught yet again with their pants down, nor am I talking about an enemy at the border. I am talking about the enemy within. I am talking about the fact that we are a nation of illiterates. I am talking about the fact that 26 countries poorer than us are sending more children to school. I am talking about the fact that we spend more on PIA, Pakistan Steel and PEPCO than we spend on education. I am talking about the fact that somewhere there is a petition signed by 170,000 citizens of Pakistan which was not delivered to the Chief Ministers of our provinces due to their lack of response (with the exception of Shahbaz Sharif). I’m talking about the tinday (a type of pumpkin) that no one wants to eat.

Fashion Models financed my first drone

“I do not support the drone attacks.” This was repeatedly emphasized by Raja Sabri Khan. What does RSK do? He makes drones! In Pakistan! In a factory in Korangi! From the time that he modified some toy planes to be more aerodynamically better, RSK knew he was going to do something with airplanes. He ended up with a degree in Aerospace Engineering “from a small liberal arts college” called MIT and got a job making tractors! What do fashion models have to do with it? RSK apparently did a stint as fashion photographer on the side in order to earn money for his drone making. Luckily SUPARCO came to the rescue and one thing led to another and we now have drones made in Pakistan measuring the weather somewhere over Australia among other things. Non-traditional exports that definitely should be encouraged! And while we are at it, we should spend some money and get RSK to make an anti-drone drone.

“The body adjusts to ambition.”

Imran KhanBefore I go any further, I must categorically state that I am not a supporter of PTI. In fact I think that Imran Khan is a terrible politician and should quit politics altogether. I must also say that I walked into TEDxKarachi expecting a political speech from Imran Khan. However, to his credit he managed to keep his political rhetoric to the minimum (a total of 4-5 minutes only). Did Imran Khan do something worthy of the impossible becoming possible? Yes. It was his ambition to become a fast bowler, going against the advice of coaches and experts who said that if he changed his action he would kill his bowling and harm his body. It was his ambition to provide a cancer hospital that provided mainly free treatment to cancer patients and it was said it can not be done. However, Shaukat Khanum is undoubtedly one of the premier cancer hospitals in the region and 75% of its patients are treated free of charge.

Bulleh Shah was the Che Guevara of his time?

I walked out of the hall when Noori was introduced. I do not actively listen to music anymore as I believe it is forbidden in Islam. However, I hear that Ali Hamza made this statement that confused many.

BullehShah-Che“Bulleh Shah was the rock star of his time. The Che Guevara of back then”

I have no clue what he meant by that. And if Bulleh Shah had been alive he too, I suspect, would be equally clueless.

“Pain is not a bad thing, it’s OK to be in pain”

Quratulain BakhtiariMy currently stiff neck begs to differ with Dr Quratulain Bakhtiari on this point. Pain is definitely a bad thing! What she meant was that feeling of pain is not a bad thing, if you channel that emotion in doing something creative. Her story of how she had to choose between her social work and her children and she chose her work. Indeed her passion for her work must have been something for her to bear the pain that only a mother can feel when she is cut off from her children. Her work in promotion of sanitation and in bringing education to girls in Balochistan was inspiring. Similarly the story of her childhood when her parents gave up their ancestral wealth to bring up their children in the Drag Colony refugee camp in Karachi. How they put a positive spin on everything unto the point that when her mother burnt her wedding dresses to harvest the silver thread from it, she made it seem a game. The standing ovation that Dr Bakhtiari got was well deserved. Her talk however made the 23 year old next to me totally confused. I guess such things are lost on the youth.

The talk that stole the show

Sarmad Tariq“I will never have enough money for full physiotherapy, because I would much rather spend it on a Ferrari. I’m not one of those people who sit around waiting for a cure. I like the attention I get in a wheelchair too much.”

Imagine that one bad decision could lead to your becoming a quadriplegic (losing function of all four limbs). Would you have the will to wake up each morning and get out of bed? Would you drive a car continuous from Khyber to Karachi? Would you tape your fingers for months to force your fingers into a hook like formation so you could hold objects? Would you enroll in a marathon pushing your own wheelchair? I would not. I would give up, blame life, God, the guy who told me the water was deep where I dove, etc. Sarmad Tariq inspired us in the true TED style. And when the hall jumped to its feet to give him a standing ovation he pointed out the irony: he could neither stand, not clap. If you had a choice of seeing just one talk from TEDxKarachi I am sure every one in the hall would say it would be Sarmad’s talk.

What good is an independent judiciary?

Mukhtar Mai“I believed the Supreme Court would provide me justice. Now I have left my case to Allah.”

The story of Mukhtar Mai, sadly, is the story of many women in our society who are subjected to abuse and treated as commodity in a tribal justice system that is sadly often allowed by our courts. To survive a panchayat sanctioned gang rape, to get the courage to file a case against the perpetrators, and to continue on living even when the “independent judiciary” failed her. She realized that her illiteracy played a major part in her inability to seek justice. Unfortunately, she is often forced to pass by and be subjected to verbal abuse by her, now acquitted, rapists. She however turns the other way and continues to her school. Mukhtar Mai used her ordeal to start an initiative to educate young girls and to educate the community on women’s rights and gender issues. The Mukhtar Mai Women’s Welfare Organization opened a high school in Fall 2007 which was the first school she ever saw in her life.

What is the take home message?

  1. We need to focus on education – Fasi Zaka, Mukhtar Mai
  2. Lack of resources should not be an excuse to do something you believe in – Raja Sabri Khan, Imran Khan
  3. Mind can triumph over body – Imran Khan, Sarmad Tariq
  4. Pain, if channeled in a positive direction, can achieve great things – Dr Quratulain Bakhtiari, Sarmad Tariq, Mukhtar Mai
  5. Don’t blame life, or anyone else. You may be down but success is about getting up that one last time. – Sarmad Tariq
  6. Bulleh Shah was a Commie (oops sorry, a revolutionary) – Noori

I would like to end with the lyrics of the chorus of Noori’s song (which they apparently also ended their ‘talk’ with). It is probably the only thing that ties them to the theme of making the impossible possible.

Hum Duniya Badal dien Ge
Hum Ne Khaayee Hai Dil Ki Qasam
Aasmaan Choo Leingay, Choo Leingay Hum….
Dil Ki Raah Dhoondain Gay!
Kay Dil Ne Jhailay Hain Kitnay Sitam…
Roti Yaadon Ko Bhooleingay Bhooleingay Hum…

I Am My Worst Critic

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perfectionistI am my worst critic. Many a blog post has been scrapped for not being up to par to my standards. Many an idea has been buried for not being worthy of being voiced by me. However, does every post you ink have to be of the utmost quality? Does every idea you build up on need to be well thought out and perfect?

Sometimes I feel that to provide the steam that any blog requires, sometimes you have to settle for not so perfect. I don’t mean that one spews forth junk for the sake of populating the RSS feed! Quality does trump quantity any day. However, sometimes stopping short of pristine is necessary to keep things going. In addition, the higher output, while not perfect, does end up improving the writing quality in the long run. Call it “Practice makes perfect” if you will.

Why am I writing this? Well considering The Pulpit is well my pulpit I should be using it to rant, rave, blow steam, praise, criticize, blah, blah, blah. Well actually I just scrapped yet another post and felt like berating myself for it. Hence, this is the product.

What do you think? “What do I think about what?” I don’t know. Just write whatever comes to mind below. :)

Interact with DiscoMaulvi

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Are you an avid reader of From The Pulpit? Do you sit around waiting for a new sermon? Do you idolize DiscoMaulvi and follow him on twitter but have never really managed to interact with him? If the answer to any of the above is yes you should seriously consider consulting a psychiatrist! :)

Jokes aside, it has been a great journey these last 2-3 years to be on Twitter and to be part of the Pakistani Twitterati and the Blaagers. Over this time I have become friends with some people and interacted with some great people. Unfortunately, I have not been very sincere to my blog and not given it the time it deserves. While I doubt I will ever gain the following and readership commanded by Awab Alvi (Teeth Maestro), Faisal Kapadia (Deadpan Thoughts), or Kalsoom Lakhani (CHUP!), or ever manage to get as passionate about things as Sana Saleem (Mystified Justice), I hope that over 2011 I will be able to dedicate more time to blogging and improve From The Pulpit.

While at the moment there is no plan to shift from to my own domain, I hope that someday in the future I will be doing that (although one of my blogging mentors Awab Alvi has been after me to take the leap).

One of the biggest challenges I face as a writer is that I am too harsh a critic of my own writing. Thus, most of my stuff is buried before I even complete it. Another problem is the lack of time I am able to give to writing. I hope I can learn to better manage my time and start cranking out some quality stuff in 2011.

The most important aspect with being a writer is the feedback you receive for what you write. Unfortunately, I have not been able to get much comments on my writing or other stuff I post. This is a setback as it is only discussion which can lead to further ideas to be generated and get the rust off my brain. Thus, in order to make it easier, here are some ways that the reader can interact with me:

Facebook Fan Page

While the Fan page of From The Pulpit has been there for time, I have decided to slowly shift to another fan page for DiscoMaulvi. I think that this fan page will be a great forum and offer discussion to take place not only on the content I post but also be a breeding ground for new ideas for me to write on. Thus, all readers are encouraged to head over to the fan page and start the interaction!


Twitter has served as a great place to interact with people but the likelihood of people being on FaceBook vs Twitter is much higher. In addition, Twitter being limited to 140 characters sometimes limits the comments greatly. However, since DiscoMaulvi has been and will stay on Twitter (as it is where I met all these wonderful people I know), head over to Twitter and start following DiscoMaulvi on Twitter.

RSS Feed & Email Updates

While I am pushing all of you to do this and that, keeping updated on when I post to From The Pulpit is necessary for a timely interaction. Thus, you need to be subscribed via RSS or email updates to be alerted when there is a new sermon. You can see the links for RSS and the form for email signup in the right hand column (I have no clue how to put them in the body of this post!).


All in all, it would be great to hear from my readers and get feedback on my posts.




2010 in review

Received the below from WordPress regarding the performance of The Pulpit as a blog. While I was rather down that I, as a blogger, had not really done much, it seems WordPress thinks otherwise.

But reality is that I have much more potential as a writer but I am not giving enough time to writing. Hence, the quality (and quantity) coming out is too little.

I pray that Allah (SWT) gives me barakah in my time in 2011 and gives me the ability to better manage my time so that I may focus on my writing.

In other news, the fan page of From The Pulpit is going to become inactive soon and the a new fan page for DiscoMaulvi has been created. You are requested to please become a fan of this new page. This step is creating room for Insha’Allah some new developments in the life of DiscoMaulvi as a writer. What is it? Stay tuned.

Finally, I would like to say a special thank you to Dr Awab Alvi, AKA Teeth Maestro, for his site being one of the top referrers to The Pulpit.





Here is what WordPress had to say

The stats helper monkeys at mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 9,000 times in 2010. That’s about 22 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 51 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 73 posts. There were 60 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 6mb. That’s about a picture per week.

The busiest day of the year was June 10th with 249 views. The most popular post that day was The Story of DiscoMaulvi.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were,,,, and

Some visitors came searching, mostly for afnan, boom boom afridi, pakistan cricket team, disco maulvi, and quaid-e-azam pictures.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.


The Story of DiscoMaulvi May 2009


Pakistan – No Longer A Living Monument Of The Quaid? June 2009


Everybody Draw Mohammed Day – A run away roller coaster? May 2010


Pakistan Floods (#PKFLOODS) – A Relief Worker’s First Hand Report From Charsadda August 2010


Hajj – Future plans of the Masjid Al-Haraam January 2010
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